Digital Citizenship in the Classroom

The use of digital technologies is beginning to start at a younger age than ever before. It is now becoming increasingly important to begin educating students about digital citizenship starting as soon as kindergarten.

For the purposes of this blog post, I have decided to take a look at Saskatchewan’s grade 2 curriculum and Ribble’s nine elements of digital citizenship to see how I could incorporate digital citizenship in my classroom and into various subjects. I have chosen to look at three elements of digital citizenship, and they are listed below.

Digital Etiquette:

The Digital Citizenship Continuum document outlines that children in K-2 should be aware that they need to treat others as they would like to be treated, both in real life and online. This would fit well with Health Education outcome USC2.4: “Examine social and personal meanings of “respect” and establish ways to show respect for self, persons, living things, possessions, and the environment.” Indicator J: “Discuss and provide examples of treating others as one would like to be treated.

Digital Rights and Responsibilities:

The Digital Citizenship Continuum document outlines that children in K-2 should understand that technology is a privilege and that there are responsibilities that come with using it. This would fit well with Social Studies outcome PA2.3: “Analyze rights and responsibilities of citizens in the school and local community.” Indicators C: “Relate the rights of citizens in the community to their responsibilities to the community” and Indicator D: “Identify opportunities for sharing responsibility in the school and community.”

Digital Health and Wellness:

The Digital Citizenship Continuum document outlines that children in K-2 should understand that spending too much time on digital devices can be harmful to your health and should take regular breaks to stretch and get some physical activity. This would fit well with Physical Education outcome PE2.2: “Analyze daily habits and actions that demonstrate personal engagement in, and taking personal responsibility for, leading a physically active life.” Indicator B: “Explain possible consequences of specific active and inactive behaviours (e.g., walking to school, playing computer games often) and habits (e.g., always stopping at stop signs when riding a bike) as they relate to the promotion of an active life.” and Indicator E: “Examine how automation (e.g., snow blowers, escalators, tread mills) and information technology (e.g., computers, heart rate monitors, video games, television) have an impact on how active people are.”

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